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PM ‘hopeful’ coronavirus restrictions can be cautiously eased
Boris Johnson has said he is “hopeful” coronavirus restrictions can be cautiously eased in the coming weeks, with vaccines providing “grounds for confidence”. The Prime Minister said he wanted the current national lockdown to be the last – and for the unlocking to be “irreversible” – ahead of the publication of his road map next week.

Mr Johnson will analyse data this week on coronavirus case numbers, hospital admissions, deaths and the impact of the vaccine rollout as he prepares his plan to reduce restrictions.

Preliminary data comparing elderly people who have received the vaccine with those who have not is starting to show it is cutting hospital admissions and deaths, according to The Times.

The paper said ministers have already been given data showing vaccines are cutting illness by about two thirds, while a separate study suggests jabs are reducing transmission.

A Public Health England spokesman said: “It is too early to draw firm conclusions from our surveillance programme.

“We have been analysing the data since the start of the vaccination programme rollout and will publish our findings in due course.”

It comes after the Prime Minister said there were “grounds for confidence” that vaccines were helping to curb the spread of coronavirus, not just in protecting those who received the jab.

Mr Johnson told a Downing Street press conference on Monday evening: “We have some interesting straws in the wind, we have some grounds for confidence but the vaccinations have only been running for a matter of weeks.”

NHS England chief executive Sir Simon Stevens said the end of April target to vaccinate the estimated 17 million people in the next five priority groups has been set due to “likely vaccine supply”, but added “if supply increases then we think we can go faster”.

He confirmed vaccines are being reserved for second booster doses, as he described the rollout of the vaccine programme as “two sprints” followed by a marathon.

On Tuesday, the Scottish Government is expected to make an announcement on the return to school of some pupils, including those aged between four and seven.

Mr Johnson has said that, in England, no decisions have been made on whether all pupils can return to school at the same time on March 8 after reports suggested a staggered approach may be taken, with secondary schools going back a week later than primaries.

Meanwhile, a new study by epidemiologists at the University of Warwick has suggested schools do not play a significant role in driving the spread of Covid-19 in the community.

Elsewhere, a study in Scotland has concluded “potentially significant risks of Covid-19 transmission” were found in pubs and bars across the country last summer despite the efforts of owners and government guidance.

The University of Stirling research, published in the Journal Of Studies On Alcohol And Drugs, is said to be the first in the world to examine the measures tackling coronavirus in licensed premises.

Business owners and representatives were interviewed before reopening to understand the challenges they faced, with researchers then visiting 29 premises for up to two hours while posing as customers.

A range of incidents with potential to increase transmission risk were observed in all but three venues in the research carried out between May and August as bars began to reopen to the public.

Incidents deemed to be of greater concern, due to the repeated or continuous nature of the potential risk and the number of customers or staff involved, were observed in 11 venues.

These included combinations of singing, shouting or playing music; mixing between groups; standing and moving around the bar without distancing; customers taking photographs with other people and staff; and shaking hands or embracing others who did not appear to be in the same household.

The Prime Minister has suggested mass vaccine coverage and the use of rapid lateral flow testing is the favoured approach to reopen “the toughest nuts to crack” such as nightclubs and theatres.

His suggestion was backed by the World Health Organisation’s special envoy on Covid-19, Dr David Nabarro, who told ITV’s Good Morning Britain: “The secret to getting life back to some degree of normality for most of us is going to be the availability of really reliable, super-quick tests.

“That will make movement so, so much easier.”

Published: 16/02/2021 by Radio NewsHub

Harry and Meghan to tell all in TV chat with Oprah
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are to give their first televised interview about Megxit, telling chat show Queen Oprah Winfrey the reasons why they walked away from the monarchy. Harry and Meghan’s sit down chat with the famous broadcaster will be aired on March 7, just a few weeks from the one-year anniversary of the couple ending their roles as senior royals.

It is expected that the Queen will review Harry’s honorary military titles before the anniversary.

Harry’s forces appointments – Captain General of the Royal Marines, Honorary Air Force Commandant of the Royal Air Force Base Honington, and Honorary Commodore-in-Chief of the Royal Naval Commands’ Small Ships and Diving – were put on hold for a year after Megxit, and he is not currently allowed to take on any roles using them.

The decision to speak publicly and the information revealed could widen the divisions between Harry and his brother the Duke of Cambridge, who are known to have a troubled relationship.

In the months leading up to the bombshell announcement in January 2020 saying they wanted to become financially independent, the rift in the royal family was laid bare when Harry said in an interview he and William were on “different paths” and have good and bad days in their relationship.

The interview will be staged in two parts, with the duchess – who announced on Sunday she is expecting her second child – being interviewed about “stepping into life as a royal, marriage, motherhood…to how she is handling life under intense public pressure”.

Later, they will be joined by Harry and the couple will speak about their move to the United States last year and their future plans.

Oprah With Meghan And Harry: A CBS Primetime Special – has been described as an “intimate conversation” by the US television network.

Winfrey is a personal friend of Meghan and attended her royal wedding in May 2018, and there was speculation at the time the couple were likely to be interviewed by the celebrity.

The global chat show star has welcomed everyone from Tom Cruise and Madonna to former president Barack Obama to sit down and discuss their lives.

CBS said in the statement: “Winfrey will speak with Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, in a wide-ranging interview, covering everything from stepping into life as a royal, marriage, motherhood, philanthropic work to how she is handling life under intense public pressure.

“Later, the two are joined by Prince Harry as they speak about their move to the United States and their future hopes and dreams for their expanding family.”

The last royal television interview aimed at setting the record straight failed spectacularly when the Duke of York appeared on a special edition of the BBC’s Newsnight.

Andrew’s attempt to explain his friendship with convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein led to him withdrawing from public life after he was accused of lacking empathy for Epstein’s victims.

His ex-wife Sarah, Duchess of York was interviewed by Winfrey in 2010 after she was left humiliated by a newspaper sting that caught her offering to sell access to Andrew for £500,000.

She repeatedly talked about herself in the third person and also broke down in tears during the confessional interview.

It is not known if Harry and Meghan informed the royal household in the UK about their plans to be interviewed, but as non-working members of the monarchy they do not have to give notice of their media commitments.

Buckingham Palace declined to comment.

Published: 16/02/2021 by Radio NewsHub

Covid-19 transmission risks found in bars despite guidance efforts, study finds
“Potentially significant risks of Covid-19 transmission” were found in pubs and bars across the country last summer despite the efforts of owners and government guidance, according to a new study. The University of Stirling research, published in the Journal Of Studies On Alcohol And Drugs, is said to be the first in the world to examine the measures tackling coronavirus in licensed premises.

Business owners and representatives were interviewed before reopening to understand the challenges faced, with researchers then visiting 29 premises for up to two hours while posing as customers.

A range of incidents with potential to increase transmission risk were observed in all but three venues in the research carried out between May and August as bars began to reopen to the public.

Incidents deemed to be of greater concern, due to the repeated or continuous nature of the potential risk and the number of customers or staff involved, were observed in 11 venues.

These included combinations of singing, shouting or playing music; mixing between groups; standing and moving around the bar without distancing; customers taking photographs with other people and staff; and shaking hands or embracing others who did not appear to be in the same household.

In the majority of premises, no staff intervention in incidents or attempts to enforce restrictions was observed.

However in some cases, staff intervened in a light-hearted way but such interventions were reported by the researchers as largely ineffective.

And while most venues required customers to provide details for contact tracing, nine businesses observed did not, including one venue visited after it was made mandatory by the Scottish Government in August.

It is hoped the findings will inform governments, public health experts, and policymakers in the UK and other countries as they consider the pandemic’s impact on hospitality and the risks of lifting restrictions.

Professor Niamh Fitzgerald, director of the university’s Institute for Social Marketing and Health, led the research which was funded by the Scottish Government Chief Scientist Office.

She said: “Our study makes a unique contribution by providing the first evidence, including direct observation data, of how premises operated in practice when allowed to reopen during the Covid-19 pandemic.

“Overall, our findings suggest grounds for uncertainty about the extent to which new rules can be consistently and effectively implemented in a sector where interaction between tables, households and strangers is the norm, and alcohol is routinely consumed.

“Despite the efforts of licensed premises, and detailed guidance from Government, potentially significant risks of Covid-19 transmission persisted in a substantial minority of observed bars – especially when customers were intoxicated.

“Blanket closures, curfews or alcohol sales bans are more likely to be deemed necessary to control virus spread, if such risks cannot be acceptably, quickly and cost-effectively reduced through support and/or sanctions for premises operators.

“Such blanket actions may also have benefits in terms of protecting staff from occupational exposure and reducing pressure on emergency services from alcohol-related injuries or disorder.

“However, attention also needs to be paid to the impact of closures on businesses, economic activity, employee hardship, and ownership patterns in the sector, as well as any risks posed by diversion of some drinking to the home.”

The paper, Managing Covid-19 Transmission Risks In Bars: An Interview And Observation Study, also involved Dr Isabelle Uny, Ashley Brown, Douglas Eadie, Dr Allison Ford, and Martine Stead at Stirling and Professor Jim Lewsey of the Institute of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow.

However, Stephen Montgomery, from the Scottish Hospitality Group (SHG), called the paper an “out-of-date witch hunt”.

He said: “The government has paid hundreds of thousands of pounds on a six-month old study based on a tiny number (0.17%) of Scotland’s bars and restaurants.

“In reality we are talking about just a handful of premises. From those 29 targeted, criticism is levelled at in their own words a ‘substantial minority of observed bars.’

“You don’t need to be a mathematician to work out that basing the closure of a £10.5 billion industry on this sham of a report would be ludicrous.

“We know that hospitality isn’t a vector and there’s no evidence to support that it is. The SHG members alone, which employ over 6000 people, have had only 32 positive cases of Covid-19 among staff since July.

“Over the period from July to 26th December, staff at SHG premises have worked around 1,150,000 hours, meaning there has been only one confirmed case for every 36,000 hours worked.

“We have bent over backwards to ensure staff and customers are protected, with huge efforts being made by the vast majority of responsible operators in social distancing, PPE, track and trace and other hygiene measures, and all without any financial help from the Scottish Government.”

Published: 16/02/2021 by Radio NewsHub

Carers offered Covid-19 jab as vaccine programme enters new phase
Carers will be offered the chance to get their first Covid-19 jab as the vaccination programme moves into a new phase in England on Monday. They join clinically vulnerable people and those aged 65 to 69 in being the next groups in line for coronavirus vaccines, NHS England said.

The Carers UK charity said being invited for a jab will bring many unpaid carers “a huge sense of relief”.

On Sunday, Boris Johnson said jabs have been offered to everyone in the Government’s top four priority groups in England.

The priority list set out by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) includes nine categories.

The top priority was care home residents and their carers, followed by people over the age of 80 and frontline health and social care workers.

The third priority group was people aged 75 and over, and the fourth group was people over the age of 70 and those deemed to be “clinically extremely vulnerable”.

The fifth group is all those 65 years of age and over, while the sixth group is all individuals aged 16 to 64 years with underlying health conditions which put them at higher risk of serious disease and mortality.

The sixth group also includes those who are in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or those who are the main carer of an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer falls ill.

Helen Walker, chief executive of Carers UK, said: “The Government, NHS and those administering the Covid-19 vaccines have made excellent progress in the last 10 weeks.

“Being called for the vaccine in this next phase will bring many unpaid carers a huge sense of relief, having carefully managed the risk of the virus to themselves and their older or disabled relatives for almost a year.

“Carers should wait to be called to book an appointment, and once vaccinated some of the hardest-pressed carers will be able to access support with their caring role for the first time in many months.

“This will be the biggest identification programme of unpaid carers ever carried out and should see more carers connected to local support systems.”

People who have received a letter can log on to the national booking service at www.nhs.uk/covid-vaccination and choose from more than 100 vaccination centres or almost 200 pharmacy services.

Anyone unable to book online can call 119 free of charge anytime between 7am and 11pm seven days a week.

NHS England said five more large-scale vaccination centres will also open their doors from this week at Alderley Park Conference centre, Burnely Mall, Chester Race Course, Preston St Johns and Westgate Chichester.

Published: 15/02/2021 by Radio NewsHub

Caroline Flack remembered by friends: An ‘angel among us’
Caroline Flack’s friends have remembered the star on the one-year anniversary of her death. The Love Island presenter took her own life at the age of 40.

Flack’s former boyfriend, Lewis Burton, posted a picture of the pair together and wrote on Instagram Stories: “I will never forget you.”

Singer Rita Ora shared a snap of the friends together, with Flack putting her arm around the singer and wrote: “Angel among us.”

Love Island narrator Iain Stirling also remembered his friend and colleague.

Accompanying a picture of the pair sharing a drink together, he wrote: “To my friend Caroline, thinking of you today. Miss you mate x”

His wife, Love Island host Laura Whitmore, posted an image of Flack.

And she wrote: “You’ve got to laugh a little, cry a little, until the clouds roll by a little.”

Presenter and friend Dawn O’Porter said Flack’s death is “still as raw” one year later.

“It’s good to talk about grief because no matter how alone it makes you feel, you are actually surrounded by a lot of people who have felt it too,” she said.

“If you dare to open up it does help.”

And she wrote next to a picture of Flack smiling: “I miss you my love.”

Flack’s manager, Nathan Charles Smith, shared videos of the star laughing as she took part in a photoshoot, and a clip of the presenter singing while sitting on the piano.

Flack was found dead at her home on February 15 2020.

A coroner later said the TV presenter killed herself because she knew she was being prosecuted for assault and could not face the coverage.

Published: 15/02/2021 by Radio NewsHub

Quarantine hotels: What you need to know
The UK’s quarantine hotel programme has come into force. Here is everything you need to know about the new measures:

– What is the new policy?

Some international arrivals are required to quarantine in a hotel room for 10 days.

– Who does this affect?

The rule applies to UK and Irish nationals, and UK residents, returning to the UK.

– Does it matter which part of the UK I arrive in?

Yes. In Scotland the policy applies to all arrivals, but in England it is only relevant for those who have been in a country on the Government’s travel ban “red list” in the past 10 days.

There are no international flights arriving in Wales or Northern Ireland.

– What is a “red list” country

This is a list of 33 countries deemed at high risk of coronavirus variants, which includes all of South America, southern Africa, Portugal and the United Arab Emirates.

The full list can be found on the Government’s website.

– What about people are are not a UK or Irish national or a UK resident?

If they have been in a “red list” country in the past 10 days they are banned from entering the UK.

– What should I do before I return to England?

Travellers must take a coronavirus test and get a negative result in the three days before they travel.

Those coming from a country on the Government’s banned list must book a “managed self-isolation package” which includes a hotel, transport and testing.

Passengers will also be required to complete a passenger locator form with details of where they will quarantine on arrival.

Those who provide false information on their locator form could face up to 10 years in prison.

– How much does a stay at a quarantine hotel cost?

The Government’s quarantine package includes the cost of transport from the airport to the designated hotel, food, accommodation and testing.

A single adult will be charged £1,750 for one room for the duration of their stay, an additional £650 for anyone over the age of 12 and £325 for children aged between five and 12.

There will be no additional fees for children under five.

– What if I don’t book a quarantine hotel?

People face a fine of up to £4,000 for not booking a quarantine package, and will still have to pay for one on arrival.

– Can I fly into any airport?

No. Those booked into a quarantine hotel can only fly into Heathrow, Gatwick, London City, Birmingham and Farnborough airports.

Those with pre-existing bookings to a different port of entry must change it to one of the above.

People who fail to do this face a fine of up to £10,000.

– What happens when I arrive?

Travellers need to provide their passenger locator form, passport and a negative Covid-19 test result to Border Force staff.

They will then be transported to their quarantine hotel, with transport also arranged back to the airport at the end of their stay.

Guests are required to quarantine in their hotel room for 10 days.

– How many quarantine hotels are there?

The Government has struck deals with 16 hotels so far, providing 4,963 rooms for the new quarantine system, with a further 58,000 rooms currently on standby.

– Will I be tested during my stay?

Guests need to take a Covid-19 test on or before day two of their stay, followed by another on or after day eight.

Those who refuse to take a test will face a £2,000 fine, the Government said.

– What happens if I test positive?

Those who test positive on day two must quarantine until day 12.

People who return a positive result on day eight must stay until day 18.

– When can I leave my quarantine hotel?

People will be able to leave after receiving a negative result from the Covid-19 test on day eight and have quarantined for a full 10 days.

– What if I’m returning from a non-“red list” country?

Passengers must instead quarantine for 10 days at home and complete two Covid-19 tests on the second and eighth day after arriving.

Main

06:4015 Feb 2021

HEALTHCoronavirus

Ministers to begin lockdown review after 15 million get a Covid jab

Ministers are to begin reviewing coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England after more than 15 million people across the UK received their first dose of a

Published: 15/02/2021 by Radio NewsHub

Duke and Duchess of Sussex expecting second child
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have announced they are expecting a second child, with an image taken remotely from London having been released. The couple on Sunday put out a black and white photo of themselves, sat under a tree in Los Angeles, with Harry gazing at his wife and resting his hand on Meghan’s head as she lies in his lap cradling her bump.

The news comes after the duchess suffered a miscarriage last summer, and just days after she won a privacy case against Associated Newspapers Limited.

A spokesperson for Meghan and Harry said: “We can confirm that Archie is going to be a big brother.

“The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are overjoyed to be expecting their second child.”

The image was shot by their long-time friend and photographer Misan Harriman, who took the picture remotely from London using an iPad.

He tweeted: “Meg, I was there at your wedding to witness this love story begin, and my friend, I am honoured to capture it grow.

“Congratulations to The Duke and Duchess of Sussex on this joyous news!”

Speaking to British Vogue following the baby announcement, Mr Harriman said: “To be asked to help share this absolute joy after such an unimaginable loss and heartache is a marker of true friendship.

“Meg reminded me that had I not introduced her to a mutual friend then she wouldn’t have met Harry.

“I’m grateful for whatever small part I played.”

On how he captured the image, he said: “With the tree of life behind them and the garden representing fertility, life and moving forward, they didn’t need any direction, because they are, and always have been, waltzing through life together as absolute soulmates.”

The Queen and the rest of the royal family were said to be “delighted” at the news.

A Buckingham Palace spokesman said: “Her Majesty, Duke of Edinburgh, Prince of Wales and entire family are delighted and wish them well.”

It is understood the couple told the royal family in advance of making the news public.

Meghan’s due date has not been revealed, but her bump appeared prominent in the photograph.

Meghan revealed her miscarriage in November last year in a deeply personal article for the New York Times, writing: “I knew, as I clutched my firstborn child, that I was losing my second.”

The couple quit their roles as senior working royals in March 2020 in a quest for personal and financial freedom, and now live in an £11 million house in Montecito in California.

The Valentine’s Day announcement came just five days after the royal family celebrated the arrival of Princess Eugenie’s first child – a baby boy.

Harry and Meghan have almost followed in the footsteps of the duke’s late mother, Diana, Princess of Wales, whose pregnancy with Harry – her second child – was announced on February 13 1984, hitting the front pages on February 14.

Baby Sussex will be the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh’s 10th or 11th great-grandchild depending on whether he or she arrives before or after Zara Tindall’s baby, which is also due in 2021.

In 2019, proud father Harry announced the arrival of their firstborn Archie to a press pool, and then later held his newborn son in his arms, with Meghan at his side, for his public debut at Windsor Castle.

The new baby, like Archie, will grow up thousands of miles away from the Queen, the Prince of Wales, and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, as well as his or her cousins Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis.

He or she will still be eighth-in-line to the throne – and the most senior royal in the current line of succession to be born overseas.

But they will not be entitled, at this stage, to be an HRH nor a prince or a princess due to rules set out more than 100 years ago by George V – but this is the same as what would have happened pre-Megxit.

The baby is entitled to be a Lord or a Lady, but Harry and Meghan will again opt to style their second-born a plain Master, like Archie, or a Miss, with the surname Mountbatten-Windsor.

On Thursday, Meghan was granted a summary judgment in relation to her privacy legal action over the Mail on Sunday and the MailOnline’s publication of a letter she wrote to her estranged father Thomas Markle.

The judge ruled the publication of the letter was “manifestly excessive and hence unlawful”.

Meghan said in a statement the win was “a victory for all “because we all deserve justice and truth, and we all deserve better”.

Published: 15/02/2021 by Radio NewsHub

Celebrity to miss Sunday’s Dancing On Ice because of back pain
Jason Donovan will not be competing in Sunday’s episode of Dancing On Ice.
ason Donovan will not be competing in Sunday’s episode of Dancing On Ice.

The actor and singer is suffering from back pain.

Celebrities are allowed to miss one week of the competition without being eliminated, according to the show’s rules.

Donovan, 52, said in a statement: “I’ve had back pain the past couple of days and I’m under doctor’s orders to take it easy and sit this week out.

“I’m resting up, I’ll be watching from home and cheering everyone on and I look forward to returning next week.”

He made the decision to pull out following advice from the programme’s medical team and will have one week to recover if he is to avoid having to withdraw from the show.

A number of celebrities have had to pull out of the competition either because of injury or coronavirus.

Joe-Warren Plant and his professional skating partner Vanessa Bauer became the fourth couple to quit the competition on Friday after they tested positive for coronaviurs.

Last week it was revealed comedian Rufus Hound was withdrawing from the competition after he tested positive for coronavirus.

Reality TV star Billie Shepherd also left the show early after injuring herself during a fall, while actress and singer Denise Van Outen withdrew after she partially dislocated her shoulder during training.

Singer Myleene Klass, former skier Graham Bell and comedian Matt Richardson have been eliminated from the competition.

– Dancing On Ice continues on ITV on Sundays at 6pm.

Published: 14/02/2021 by Radio NewsHub

More than 15 million people in UK have had first Covid-19 vaccine dose
15 Million is the equivalent of everyone in the Government’s top four priority groups.
More than 15 million people in the UK have now had a first dose of a Covid-19 vaccine – the equivalent of everyone in the Government’s top four priority groups.

Vaccine Minister Nadhim Zahawi confirmed the milestone on Sunday afternoon, a few hours after Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said the Government was confident it was “on track” to meet its deadline of offering a jab to people most at risk by Monday.

The priority list set out by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) includes nine categories.

The top priority was care home residents and their carers, followed by people over the age of 80 and frontline health and social care workers.

The third priority group was people aged 75 and over, and the fourth group was people over the age of 70 and those deemed to be “clinically extremely vulnerable”.

Writing on Twitter, Mr Zahawi said: “15,000,000! Amazing team. We will not rest till we offer the vaccine to the whole of phase1 the 1-9 categories of the most vulnerable & all over 50s by end April and then all adults.”

The target was set back on January 4 when Prime Minister Boris Johnson said that by mid-February it is expected that the first vaccine dose will have been offered to everyone in the four top priority groups identified by the JCVI.

On that day, Mr Johnson said: “If we succeed in vaccinating all those groups, we will have removed huge numbers of people from the path of the virus.

“And of course, that will eventually enable us to lift many of the restrictions we have endured for so long.”

Published: 14/02/2021 by Radio NewsHub

School reopening decision could be reversed if cases rise
A new variant of Covid-19 would be enough to close schools in Wales after they reopen later this month, the First Minister has said.
A new variant of Covid-19 would be enough to close schools in Wales after they reopen later this month, the First Minister has said.

Foundation phase schoolchildren aged three to seven will return to classrooms in Wales from February 22, along with some older learners on vocational courses.

But Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford told Sky News’s Sophy Ridge On Sunday programme that the decision could be reversed if “things were to go against us”.

Mr Drakeford said: “The advice to us from our chief medical officer and scientists is that you should, in these early stages, always take measures that could be reversed quickly if you needed to do that.

“If there were to be unintended consequences of having three to seven-year-olds back into school, then, of course, we would be able to go into reverse.”

He said Wales was in a position to allow the youngest children back into school as a result of its national lockdown which began shortly before Christmas.

But he stressed that return was a “tentative” first step, which would be closely monitored.

Mr Drakeford added: “We want this to be the first step on the journey to getting more children back into the classroom.

“But if things were to go against us, if a new variant were to appear for example, then we could go back to the position we are in today.”

Plaid Cymru’s leader Adam Price, meanwhile, said Covid-19 cases should be reduced even further before lockdown is lifted as another wave would be “disastrous” for the economy.

He told BBC’s Andrew Marr Show: “Now is the time to ensure we have steady progress and avoid the possibility of a third or fourth wave, which would be not just disastrous in terms of public health, but also in terms of economy.

“Because it is that ‘stop, go’ cycle of lockdown, then release, then lockdown again, which has led to great uncertainty in economic terms and we should avoid that at all costs.

“So let’s drive down the level of cases even further.”

Published: 14/02/2021 by Radio NewsHub


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